LGBTI equality and human rights in Europe and Central Asia

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“I’m afraid for my family if the authorities find out about my homosexuality.” Criminalisation in Uzbekistan: Oliver’s story

At this moment, the Central Asian country of Uzbekistan has a historic opportunity to decriminalise same-sex relations between men and provide better protection for LGBT people. In today’s blog, Oliver, an LGBT activist from Uzbekistan , shares his story with us, and what changing the Criminal Code would mean for him.

The lived realities of LGBTI people in every single EU country show that it’s not yet an LGBTIQ Freedom Zone

The EU is now an LGBTIQ Freedom Zone, as declared by the European Parliament. This is great news, but real action must be taken to make this a lived reality for LGBTI people across the EU.

The rise of anti-LGBTI crime in Europe: How will the EU address it?

In 2020 a Europe-wide survey found an alarming rise in crime and harassment against LGBTI people, with almost 60% reporting incidents over the past five years. At the same time the European Commission has adopted a strategy on victims rights across member states, but how will it impact the growing number of anti-LGBTI crimes?

ILGA-Europe’s Annual Review finds that LGBTI people and communities have been pushed to the brink

The ILGA-Europe Annual Review of the Human Rights Situation for LGBTI People in Europe and Central Asia contains a stark message that progress which has been taken for granted is not only increasingly fragile, but particularly vulnerable to exploitation by anti-human rights forces. Read on for our 10 key findings.

LGBTI activists create a Twitter storm for EU infringement procedures against Poland over so called ‘LGBT-free Zones’

ILGA-Europe launched an-hour long Twitter Storm demonstration on February 11, calling on the European Commission to take infringement procedures against Poland, making the Polish-based hashtag #infringementNOW trend

“If You Are Parent in One Country, You Are Parent in Every Country”: But still today a child can be stateless in the EU just because it has two mothers

A baby born to two mothers, one from Gibraltar and one from Bulgaria, has become a test case at the European Court of Justice for the freedom of movement of rainbow families in the EU. Read on and find out how to join our campaign for parents without borders!

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